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Forbes Mentions Port of Lake Charles

Posted on: December 15th, 2017

These 10 U.S. Seaports’ Exports Are Growing The Most This Year, And Here’s Why
Ken Roberts, Forbes
Click here to view article

2017 will go down as a good year for U.S. trade growth, but that’s coming on the heels of a rarity — two successive years of decline, something that had only happened once before in at least a quarter century.

Here is a look at the 10 U.S. seaports where exports have grown the most this year, with the top five outbound shipments for each. I will follow in the coming days with a look at the top airports and the top border crossings for exports and then tackle the imports for all three.

All told, there are more than 450 of these “ports” for international goods to enter and exit the United States. While total U.S. exports are up 6.13% this year, exports by ocean are up 10.98%. Air cargo trade, whether in the belly of passenger planes or on so-called freighters, is up 6.11% and border crossings, whether via truck, rail or pipeline, is up 2.02%. Ocean trade, by value, makes up 33.68 percent of all U.S. exports.

On the import side, overall U.S. imports are up 6.75% while ocean-borne shipments are up 7.51%. The value of air cargo is up 6.14% while border trade is up 6.08%. On the import side, 46.20% of all U.S. trade is via ship. All of the data is based on analysis of the latest U.S. Census Bureau data, which is through October, as analyzed by the company where I serve as president, WorldCity.

Eight of the 10 ports with the greatest increase in the value of their exports this year can attribute those gains to rebounding prices in the energy sector — just as they could attribute their losses in recent years to that same sector — and, to a lesser extent, the chemical industry. Four of the top 10 are in Texas and four are in Louisiana.

1. Topping the list is Port Houston, which has seen the value of trade attributed to the port increase $6.16 billion. Here’s a look at the top five exports:

Gasoline and other refined petroleum products rose 27.05% compared to last year to $14.76 billion.
LNG, or petroleum-based gases 47.73% to $6.44 billion.
Plastics rose 2.68% to $2.57 billion.
Oil rose 137.55% to $2.05 billion.
Ethers and related exports rose 16.34% to $1.73 billion.

2. Exports from the Port of Corpus Christi have grown the second most this year, up $4.69 billion. It’s top five exports:

Gasoline rose 9.05% to $5.4 billion.
Oil rose 355.48% to $4.52 billion.
Halogenated derivatives of hydrocarbons rose 24.35% to $491.65 million.
Grain sorghum rose 23.73% to $329.9 million.
Cyclic hydrocarbons rose 18.59% to $322.51 million.

3. Exports from Beaumont, Texas have increased $3.16 billion. Its top five exports thus far in 2017:

Oil rose 309.61% to $2.95 billion.
Gasoline rose 21.58% to $2.54 billion.
LNG, etc., rose 81.2% to $1.42 billion.
Ethers, etc., fell 6.19% to $303.71 million.
Cyclic hydrocarbons fell 1.66% to $136.17 million.

4. Exports from the Port of Los Angeles have increased $2.53 billion — and it doesn’t have to do with the energy sector:

Cotton rose 73.39% to $1.49 billion.
Frozen beef rose 72.95% to $894.06 million.
Motor vehicle parts rose 19.19% to $872.45 million.
Almonds and similar nuts rose 23.42% to $841.5 million.
Motor vehicles for transporting people rose 14.13% to $594.2 million.

5. Exports from the Southern Louisiana ports around Gramercy have increased $2.32 billion. It is an oil story:

Soybeans fell 2.51% to $3.98 billion.
Gasoline rose 2.87% to $3.26 billion.
Oil rose 886.35% to $1.85 billion.
Corn rose 5.96% to $1.53 billion.
Coal, briquettes rose 146.61% to $325.52 million.

6. The Port of New Orleans is sixth on the list, its exports up $2.27 billion. Its top five exports:

Gasoline rose 47.71% to $5.81 billion.
Soybeans fell 7.63% to $3.82 billion.
Civilian aircraft and parts rose 16.85% to $3.51 billion.
Computer chips fell 28.29% to $2.5 billion.
Corn fell 12.98% to $2.41 billion.

7. Exports from Lake Charles, La., have increased $1.99 billion through October. Its growth is largely related to LNG, or liquid natural gas:

Gasoline rose 25.25% to $2.43 billion.
LNG, etc., rose 236.66% to $1.83 billion.
Sodium or potassium hydroxide or peroxide rose 75.03% to $173.66 million.
Petroleum products rose 25.71% to $157.84 million.
Cyclic hydrocarbons fell 7.22% to $138.23 million.

8. Exports from Baton Rouge, La., are up $1.78 billion, with soybeans joining gasoline and other refined petroleum products as a big gainer:

Gasoline rose 70.19% to $1.95 billion.
Soybeans rose 35.27% to $1.37 billion.
Corn rose 9.55% to $510.05 million.
Soybean oilcake, other solid residue, rose 44.04% to $393.46 million.
Acyclic alcohols rose 24.64% to $309.33 million.

9. The Port of Savannah is the second port on the list not tied to the energy sector, the other being the Port of Los Angeles. Savannah’s exports have increased $1.55 billion this year, with outbound shipments of cotton leading the way:

Motor vehicles for transporting people fell 1.28% to $1.45 billion.
Chemical wood pulp, fell 2.24 percent compared to last year to $1.11 billion.
Civilian aircraft, parts fell 15.73 percent compared to last year to $930.82 million.
Cotton rose 55.86% to $909.3 million.
Misc. uncoated kraft paper, paperboard rose 16.35% to $786.09 million.

10. Freeport’s exports have increased $1.48 billion in 2017, with the top five exports:

LNG, etc. have totaled $1.21 billion. The previous year, there were no exports in this category.
Motor vehicles for transporting people fell 30.19% to $797.74 million.
Oil rose 285.15% to $761.09 million.
Sodium or potassium hydroxide or peroxide rose 49.15% to $260.88 million.
Polyethers, epoxides and polyesters fell 17.7% to $125.07 million.
Seven of these 10 are also the fastest-growing major seaports, by percentage gain. Lake Charles, Beaumont and Corpus Christi all grew more than 60% through the first 10 months of the year. Freeport’s exports are up 57.90% while Baton Rouge is up more than 40%.

Krielow and Lorenzi Join Port Board Of Commissioners

Posted on: October 30th, 2017

Carl Krielow and Thomas Lorenzi have been appointed by Governor John Bel Edwards to the Board of Commissioners of the Lake Charles Harbor & Terminal District, which operates the Port of Lake Charles.

An attorney with Lorenzi & Barnatt, Lorenzi was named as the 2007 Distinguished Attorney by the Louisiana Bar Foundation and was the recipient of the David A. Hamilton Lifetime Achievement Award from the Louisiana State Bar Association. He has served as president and board member for various state and local professional associations throughout his legal career.

Krielow has over 35 years of experience in the construction, real estate and agricultural industries, and he manages commercial real estate interests and agricultural operations involved in crop production. Krielow is a member of the Louisiana Independent Rice Producers Association and the U.S. Rice Producers Association.

Dudley Dixon Appointed Board President

Posted on: October 30th, 2017

Former Westlake mayor Dudley Dixon was elected 2017–2018 president of the board of commissioners of the Lake Charles Harbor & Terminal District, which operates the Port of Lake Charles.

Other new board officers are Mike Eason of Merrill Lynch, vice president; John LeBlanc of Phillips 66, secretary-treasurer; and Elcie Guillory, assistant secretary-treasurer.

Dixon has served on the port board since 2012, when he was nominated by the city of Westlake and appointed by then-Governor Bobby Jindal. A native of Westlake, he worked for Conoco from 1961 to 1982. He served two terms on the Westlake City Council, and in 1982 was elected mayor of Westlake, serving six terms.

Rice Cook-Off Winners Announced

Posted on: September 26th, 2017

In celebration of September as National Rice Month, the Calcasieu-Cameron Rice Growers sponsored the 20th Annual Rice Cook-Off on Wed., Sept. 20 at the Port of Lake Charles. The Port hosted the event and sponsored the awards luncheon. Family and Consumer Science students from seventeen area middle schools and high schools participated in the event.

First place for the “Best Dish” category went to Briley Kent (Shrimp and Rice Salad) of Johnson Bayou School; second place went to Lilly Jones (Louisiana Risotto) of Moss Bluff Middle School; third place was awarded to Claire Leonards (Deconstructed Stuffed Cabbage Casserole) of Bell City High School; and “Most Heart Healthy” dish went to Tonika Phillips (Caribbean Shrimp and Saffron Street Tacos) of Dequincy High School. Farmers Rice Milling Co., Inc. sponsored rice cookers for each contestant.

The production, milling and exportation of rice have major economic effects on Southwest Louisiana, and the event helps to educate local students in health and nutrition issues facing Southwest Louisiana families.

For more information, contact Michelle Bolen with the Port of Lake Charles at 337-493-3501.

Richert Self Appointed As Port of Lake Charles Deputy Executive Director

Posted on: August 8th, 2017

Lake Charles, La.­—The board of commissioners of the Lake Charles Harbor and Terminal District has appointed Richert Self as Deputy Executive Director of the Port of Lake Charles. He will serve as deputy to Executive Director Bill Rase.

Self has been part of the Port of Lake Charles administration since 2003 when he joined as Director of Finance and Administration. A native of Lake Charles, Self holds a bachelor’s degree in business from McNeese State University and a master’s degree in business administration from the University of New Orleans, and he is a certified public accountant.

Self is actively involved with the American Association of Port Authorities, from which he holds a certification of professional port manager. He also works closely with the Gulf Ports Association of the Americas and currently serves as vice president of the Gulf Seaports Marine Terminal Conference.

In 2008, Self was a graduate of Leadership Louisiana, and in 2016, he was appointed to the Louisiana Board of International Commerce by Gov. John Bel Edwards.

Hurricane Plan 2017

Posted on: June 20th, 2017

The Port provides safe harbor for all vessels at no charge on a first come, first serve basis until it has no additional occupancy. It provided refuge for 130 to 150 such vessels during Hurricanes Ike and Gustav.

Download the Port of Lake Charles Hurricane Plan:

Hurricane Plan 2017

The Port Report: Summer 2017

Posted on: June 14th, 2017

In this issue: Dr. Burckel Selected As McNeese President, Calcasieu Ship Channel Impacts, Updates on Southern Ionics and Lake Charles Methanol and more.

Click here to view the newsletter and click here to sign up for future issues.

KPLC-TV Consider This: Support the Calcasieu Ship Channel

Posted on: April 17th, 2017

Consider This: Support the Calcasieu Ship Channel

From John Ware, KPLC-TV
To view video, click here.

The Calcasieu Ship Channel is vital to our economy.

Estimates are that 36,000 jobs and 46 cents out of every dollar in your pocket comes from ship channel-related activities. Our industries rely on the channel to bring in raw materials and export products. That’s an economic driver we can’t afford to lose.

But there’s a problem. The channel has to be dredged to keep it deep enough for big ships. It costs about $8 million a year from the state budget to acquire space for the dredging.

But the channel generates about $155 million a year in state taxes, so it’s a good investment. If I asked you to give me $8 and told you I’d give you back $155, you’d probably want to make that deal. The state should also want to make a deal like that.

As the legislature looks for places to save money in the state budget, we think it’s crucial that they keep this investment in Southwest Louisiana. We suggest you support the ship channel and the Port of Lake Charles, and ask the state to do the same.

Without the channel, it would be tough to keep Southwest Louisiana open for business.

Presentation to Louisiana Gas & Oil Association

Posted on: March 13th, 2017

The following presentation was given by the Port of Lake Charles to the Louisiana Gas & Oil Association. Please click here to view.

Commissioner Elcie J. Guillory Awarded Charles A. Downing Humanitarian Award

Posted on: January 10th, 2017
Elcie Guillory (center, left) with Nancy Sanner and Mark Judson.

Elcie Guillory (center, left) with Nancy Sanner and Mark Judson.

Lake Charles Harbor & Terminal District board of commissioner, Elcie J. Guillory, was honored with this year’s Charles A. Downing Humanitarian Award on Oct. 21. The award was presented by Nancy Sanner and Mark Judson. The prestigious award was presented by the SWLA Law Center, and it is named for the late psychologist who provided services to the disadvantaged.